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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
in personnel to maintain their strength. 14,000 served in that combat in italy. 9,000 500 received purple hearts, 21 medal of honors including senator inouye's medal of honor. and it was a remarkable time and remarkable commitment that he demonstrated to the country that he loved. i know we'll talk about his record and i may do that later myself but i just want to say what i think about daniel inouye in his core. he shared with us at prayer breakfast. we don't quote what people say at that meeting but he talked about his feeling about war and his participation in it. it was one of the most moving presentations i think any of us had seen. and it was so well received by the people there t. truth is senator inouye did not like war. he hated war. he knew the drubblingtive power of war and how people suffered as a result of it. and he voted against a number of resolutions that would commit the united states to military action. but at the same time, there was no doubt based on his ranking and chairmanship over a period of years, decades e he was a person who always at bottom could be counted on
was in congress i have the invitation of president carter to visit italy with the delegation. we went there to deliver assistance from the united states government after an earthquake in southern italy. in one of the villages we visited there was a rehearsal for first communion going on in the church. just about every seven-year-old in the village was there practicing. when the earthquake hit, the roof came down and every seven- year-old in the village was gone. it was impossible to console people there. not only have they individually lost their child, which is unthinkable, but the whole town had passed -- have lost that class. their babies. that really transformed my thinking about how fragile life is. this was a natural disaster. what happened in the town -- newtown was a personal decision whose judgment was impaired. how could he do this? because he had his own problems. how could he do this? because he had the guns. he had the assault magazines to do it. that is how he could do it. let's at least try to mitigate for the circumstances we may not be able to control entirely, the me
to the people of spain and italy and portugal and ireland who are being told to pull in their belts. >> is it the truth of the matter that literally the only way that you can be sure that you end up with a less than inflation increase is by not announcing that you're going to use it and by making sure that you negotiation all the way through? it's a child that announces on the first day of the negotiations that they're going to use the veto because of course the commission gets its way. >> i have had police officer who is came to my surgery and they understand that their pay is frozen. they're less happy about the terms and conditions. they're less happy about not getting their increments. but what they don't understand is why other elements of budget and in particular the european union should be guaranteed inflationary increases, let alone inflationary increases all the way through 2020. >> i'm very grateful to the honorable member who i personally have the utmost respect. does she have the utmost respect for the members opposite who voted time and time to give away our powers and
with the famous 442nd regimental combat team in world war ii and was grievously wounded in battle in italy. now, mr. president, the citation, the words for his medal of honor are as follows -- every medal of honor recipient, they write a paragraph or two about why he was given this award -- "on april 21, 1945, inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily defended ridge near san turazo in tuscany, italy. the ridge served as a strong point along the strip of german fortifications known as a gothic line which represent the last and most dogged line of german defense in all of italy. as he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three german machine guns opened fire from covered positions just 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. inouye stood up to the attack and was shot in the stomach. ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his thompson sub machine gun. after being informed of the severity of his wound by his platoon sergeant, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the se
should let, and italy has more forward in an expedited fashion open to a private contractor who is now providing competing service to the public sector in italy so we can look at some things that may not be successful in other countries and tried to pick the very best options. let me yield mel. >> thank you. i can only take my colleagues at his word. when we went to the central valley, one of the robot has been the lack of knowing the details. the conversation you just went through with mr. lahood, how could we expect to get an update on who these private companies are that are able to invest that come much are they willing to invest that i have heard him say the same concern for over a year now. when do you anticipate the governor would work with you to present a package of how we might be able to get the private investment? >> i'm not going to speak for the governor. this has not been determined. companies that want to invest. >> can you also expressed to the governor on half of this committee that he would give some of state whether he wants to do it through closed sessions are give
to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france some day. and his generals were pulling their hair out and eisenhower was. wanted to be all over the map, everywhere. and the fiores -- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be able to sustain anything meaningful? >> this is a very good question. whether or not the civilian efforts are sustainable, it depends on whether or not the civilians are empowered to meet the needs are not. i work with a supreme assembly. what i know about the council is not based on my filtered to allow bela lot of. -- based on my relationship with aleppo. one of the main challenges they are facing is this empowerment components. they have ambitious projects. in the security committee in of did not want the fsa to control the liberated areas. to do this they appointed a brigadier general. i met with him. he wanted to start a com
carter to visit italy with the delegation, members of congress, italian american members of congress, and we went there to deliver assistance from the dwrites government after an earthquake in southern italy. and one of the village we visited there was a rehearsal for first commune ongoing on in the church. so just about every 7-year-old in the village was in church practicing for first holy commune on. when the earthquake hit, the -- communian. when the earthquake hit, the roof came down, every 7-year-old in the village was gone. it was impossible to console the people there. not only had they individually lost their child, which is unthinkable, but the whole town had lost that class, their future, their new growth, their hopes, their babies. their babies. so how -- and that really frmpled my thinking about how fragile -- transformed my think being how fragile life is. this was a natural disaster. what happened in newtown was a personal decision about someone whose judgment was thoroughly impaired, who had -- how could he do this? how could he do it? because he had his own problems.
. italy bought apples to apples, we have to cut all the slavery's -- all the slaves -- if we count apples to apples, we have to count all slaves in all forms for all times. it is important to note that of course slavery is a legal and morally unacceptable today, which has not been the case for the majority of human history. the existence of what ever number, millions or more of the slaves today, represents a substantial failing for all of us. ok, i am going to give you some numbers. i will cheat. i am not going to go into the specific definition. that is in my book. it would take me too much time to get into the nuances and footnotes. the definition has to do with restrictions of liberty and a portion of services. i had been gathering data for more than a decade now. i take my definition in my most current book, and i say, a if issue this broadly, the numbers will look like this. if we are more narrow in what we mean by terms like coercion and restrictions of liberte, the next slide shows you those numbers. the upshot is this. i built a 95% confidence interval. i can tell you that the num
wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france sunday. his generals were pulling their hair out. eisenhower was. he wanted to be all over the map everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at
military. that says it all. after being gravely wounded in italy, his arm was amputated. he spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds at an army hospital in michigan. future majority leader bob dole, another young gi, who had been also wounded in the european theater, and he told senator inouye he wanted to go to law school and go to congress. bob dole was elected to congress one year after senator inouye. senator inouye always joked, "i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. " he has been a soft and powerful voice. although he was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vital presence in the senate, and in death, he will remain a legend. his last words on earth, "aloha," and it is with a heavy heart that we did him aloha, we love you, to a legend of the senate, daniel inouye. -- we bid him aloha. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend condolences to his family, colleagues, and constituents. in late 1963, a young freshman senator stood under the splenda dome, as we do now, in vigil an
to address the climate crisis. it is all over the world. venice, italy is flooded. a tornado in italy the other day. japan just had another tsunami. the disaster of sewage and leaks. the climate apex for a meeting was just a in dubai. they came to the conclusion that climate change is over use of fossil fuels and natural gas and oil. the amount of fossil fuels utilize by countries with huge populations such as india and china. we need energy, but we need to move onto clean energy. that is one of the president's priorities. he can create a whole new infrastructure that replaces the military industrial that eisenhower warned us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priorit
a series of machine guns on a hill in italy on april 21, 1945. his actions rightly earned him the medal of honor. he was the embodyment of the greatest generation, courage, sacrifice, humility and love of country. this was a commitment to serve and protect those who fight for our country is one he took personally. why he always stood up for the ideals of freedom and justice that our country is founded upon because he saw firsthand what happens when we don't and it's why he was always proud to stand up for our heritage in hawaii. the truth is, senator inouye deeply loved our beautiful state of hawaii. half a september try ago, he had a vision of the hawaii we inherit from him today. he displayed a builder's skill, pouring the foundation of the modern and vibrant hawaii that is his legacy. and so the greatest tribute we can pay him is to acquire his vision, apply his skills and build on the remarkable foundation he laid for us. from strengthening our schools and university to building our roads and bridges and just today, our state marked another milestone led by senator inouye. we signed
military. that says it all. after being gravely wounded in italy, senator inouye's arm was amputated. he spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds in an army hospital in michigan. there he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inou
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
sure we are all over it. we had a blip in the 1980's, italy in new york, and it would be interesting to have -- particularly in the york, and it would be interesting to have thomas frieden comment because he was the head of the health system in new york city. if you look at hiv but in africa, one-third of the individuals withhiv are infected with tuberculosis. from the global standpoint it is a huge problem that we are behind in our research effort. we need better drugs. the vaccine is not the best vaccine. we need diagnostics that are essentially point-of-care instantaneous. we tend to forget about tuberculosis, but it is an important disease. host: dr. frieden, tuberculosis on the phone lines? guest: -- front lines? guest: i would make three points. tuberculosis reminds us why public health is so important. you have to have a strong public health department to make sure that every patient with tuberculosis is fully treated because it remains terrible, and everyone of their contacts should be tested to see if they have become infected, and if they have, get them preventive treatment
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
service cross, bronze star, purple hea heart, left an arm in italy. a. as he said to me that last meeting we had together, "anything other than the arm?" i got shot in the arm and in the leg a couple times sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and i
, we got a three here. caller: i am about an hour from newtown. italy makes a difference if she did not have her firearms secured. -- it only makes a difference if she did not have her firearms secured. host: thanks for your time. guest: james is right about the issue with serial numbers on various parts. particularly assault rifles and can be reassembled in various ways. there are things that can be done. you can step serial numbers on various parts of the action of the gun. most guns used in crime are handguns. those have less squabble parts -- swappable parts. this point about education, that is certainly right. everyone would be a lot safer if gun owners were required to go through some sort of safety training. a lot of folks to not go through training because there are no rules in most states requiring them to do so. it is very difficult to know whether the person who is purchasing a firearm and knows what they're doing with it and knows how to secure it. that is why a lot of these guns and up being used inadvertently or otherwise in crime or accidental shootings. host:a tweet,
american. my family came from italy. just because i'm white, we do not look at those numbers the way. the immigrants here today or 20 or 30 years ago, their children in 30 years will have children. you are looking at a third generation americans. i don't understand the numbers of what you are looking at at 2043. guest: that is an important question as to how we classify people. we have a ready rate of enter ethnic an interracial marriage in the united states. it is fairly high for asians and for hispanics. my prediction is that 20 years or so outcome these kinds of categories will be pretty much obsolete or take a different form. i think that is what the caller is getting at. what kind of race or ethnicity would call them and so forth? things blur a labatt more than we see -- a little more. host: we are looking at america by the numbers. william frey is a senior fellow at the brookings institution. manuel from buffalo, new york. caller: good morning. this is interesting stuff. we saw the 2010 census. we saw the census missed a lot minorities accounted a lot of whites twice. how does
just said. the title to docket -- the was an incredible amount of it zaidi over that document. if italy comes up that the conversations i have -- an anxietyble amount of z over that document. it has come up in a lot of the conversations i have had. there was no evidence for the fcc to adjust at all. >> i had an entrepreneur thomas this week they are distressed. so many federal agencies are trying to solve problems that do not exist. i think there is a problem with that. mr. chairman, have you had discussions about a reclassification of broadband services via the title 2, if the fcc loses the dc circuit? >> no, we're for august on a framework that is in place and working -- we are focused on a remark that is in place and working. >> do you feel like you have the authority to reclassify broadband services under the title 2 and subject them to regulation? >> we do have that authority. >> when do you plan to close that title? >> we do not have plans to close it. we are seeing a sector that is very strong and growing and leading the world. >> you plan to just leave it open as long as you wan
because i promised we would be when i was out here earlier with the foreign minister of italy, not to take away from the important focus we had on 2013, the year of cultural -- italian culture in america. i said i would be available for questions later. so here i am. once again, the republicans have isolated themselves on this middle income tax cut, the president is poised with his pen to sign it. it has passed the senate. democrats in the house are ready to vote for it. and the republicans in the house are resisting. do you remember last year when we went through this on the payroll tax? passed the senate, passed the president, ready to sign, the democrats in the house supporter -- supportive and they held out and held out until they couldn't hold out any longer. i don't know if they understand the impact of that uncertainty on america's households. i certainly hope they do. right now on the floor we're taking up a bill that -- a rule that will say we can continue until december 28 to bring up suspensions. however, they are -- there is more serious business we have to be dealing with, unl
to go into the military. he became an outstanding member of the military. and in italy, he did -- there were exploits that he performed that won him the congressional medal of honor. and you don't get that unless you are an extraordinary human being. he took out an enemy position, a german position when he was hit again and again and again. he lost one of his arms, and he just kept going. and i wish he was still here today. i called him on the phone when i found out about that and i told him i never met him but i wanted to know that members of the house thought he was an extraordinary man and i'm sure he will be missed. i have been here 30 years and i'm retiring at the end of this term. and i thought i ought to have at least have a little bit of a swan song maybe five or 10 minutes and talk to my colleagues about what's happened over the 30 years. when i first came here, i was a very young man and i knew everything. you couldn't tell me anything. and now that i have been here 30 years, i realized i didn't know much of anything and i probably know less now than i did then. but t
and permanently disabled. his actions on 21 april 1945 in italy were a towering example of strength, stamina, courage, and determination. for which he received one of the 21 medical -- middle of honors. he and other nisei veterans achieve something monumental, and a sense they had earned the right to take larger roles in their communities. that also came home tolerant of the use of politics different than their own, a sentiment born of the intolerance they had experienced after pearl harbor, but more keenly felt after the horrors they witnessed in liberating dachau, and they understood the understand -- the importance of good citizenship, fair play, hard work a lot of respect for others, and for our flag. i had relatives who served in these stories units, characteristic of them all was rarely if ever speaking about what they had done in the war. from them, my generation learned to find virtue in humility and inability of hard work and the value of family and the confidence that we in america could achieve anything. they taught us the hope -- to hope and to dream. then to do something to do s
[indiscernible] $750 billion came through and it was more aggressively priced than italy, spain, and portugal. that is where you create economic prosperity. the agencies are doing fantastic stuff but it will not create what we need on that continent. the marginal interventions are not going to create economic growth. we know how to create jobs, so instead of having large subsidy programs, start there. get rid of those programs and we can talk about economic growth. >> you can understand why they are the most prominent voices in the business. >> a look at social media and on line speech. this is half an hour. >> we are going to shift gears a bit. i took my tie off the war earlier this morning. first, there is wifi here. you should log on to the nyu guest account. user name is guest131. password is right there for you. we will talk about the use of social media. it has been on everyone's lips the last couple of years. we have wonderful guests that are known for their engagement with their audience. i predict we are going to hear a little bit of criticism and push back on some of the wisdom of s
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)